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Joseph Roth Collection 1897-1995

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Joseph Roth Collection 1897-1995


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MICROFILMS:

MF 125 contains: Kranke Menscheit. Flucht ohne Ende. Trotzki. Keine Spur von einem Fox. Der liebe Gott. Der Motorradfahrer. Die noerdlichen Laender

MF 144 contains: "Reise nach Russland" in Frankfurter Zeitung (November, 1928). Nur echte Ergebnisse. Buecher von Soldaten. "Die Frau von den Barrikaden" in Literatur Beilage der Franfurter Zeitung (April, 1927). "Reise nach Albanien" in Frankfurter Zeitung (April, 1927). Schwarz-Gelbes Tagebuch. Der Apokalyptische Redner. Der Amerikanismus im Literaturbetrieb. "Tua Culpa" in Oestereichische Post (139). Das Unsagbare. "Juden, Judenstaat und die Katholiken" in Der Christliche Staendestaat (September 26, 1937). Emmigration. Paper clippings from "Das Neue Tagebuch" (1933-1938)

Addenda: Video tape of Dutch tv-movie by Hans Keller, "Joseph Roth's Grosse-Welt Bioskop-Theater" [videotape removed to A/V Collection]

MF 453 contains "Die Kapuzinergruft"

The larger part of the Joseph Roth Collection originates from material saved by his French translator, Blanche Gidon. It mostly contains Joseph Roth's manuscripts, drafts and copies of his newspaper articles and essays. Material is both handwritten and typewritten. There are a few personal items of Joseph Roth and his wife Friederike in this collection - business cards, Joseph Roth's receipts from several hotels, and articles about Joseph Roth, including published obituaries. The photos of Joseph and Friederike Roth are the most significant part of this series

Joseph Roth was born in Brody in Galicia, then part of the Habsburg Monarchy, now Ukraine, on September 26, 1894 in the family of Maria (Miriam) Roth nee Gruebel and Nahum Roth. He worked as a journalist before focusing on writing novels and short stories. Joseph Roth died in the Necker hospital in Paris on May 27, 1939. His wife, Friederike (Friedl), who was diagnosed with schizophrenia in 1928, lived in an Austrian mental sanatorium, where she was killed in the Nazi euthanasia program in 1940

EAD finding aid available online

The more substantial part of the collection comes from the Joseph Roth estate that his French translator, Blanche Gidon, preserved during the Second World War. After the war, Joseph Roth's cousin, Fred Grubel, picked up a suitcase with Joseph Roth's papers from her and transferred them to the United States. It took several years until the rights and heritage procedures were cleared up. In January 1963, the bulk of the collection arrived at the Leo Baeck Institute Archives. The papers of Joseph Roth were arranged into six series that were assigned call numbers AR 1836-AR 1841. Later on, Fred Grubel, the executive director of the Leo Baeck Institute, added materials about Joseph Roth that he had been collecting since the end of the war. This addition contained correspondence related to the fate of the collection after the war, reviews of Joseph Roth's works published after 1945, and several texts on Joseph Roth. This addendum is complemented by the material from the estate of Friderike Zweig, the widow of Stefan Zweig, donated by Caroline Birman, who took part in clearing the rights and safe-guarded Joseph Roth's papers after their arrival to the United States, in 1963 and 1971. In the 1990s other material was added, usually invitations to exhibits or conference programs that took place on the occasion of Joseph Roth's anniversaries. Several scholarly and popular articles were also added to the collection. Some of the more significant addenda include a microfilm of the manuscript of the Kapuzinergruft from the St. Etienne Gallery in 1990 mediated by Fritz Hackert (MF 453) and catalog cards and the inventory of the so-called Berliner Nachlass from the Schiller- Nationalmuseum und deutschen Literaturarchiv, Marbach am Neckar, Germany in 1995

Published in LBI Bulletin No. 25, 1964

Letters of Joseph Roth to his parents are available at the Dokumentationsstelle für neuere oesterreichische Literature (Vienna, Austria). The so-called Berliner Nachlass of Joseph Roth is housed in the Schiller-Nationalmuseum und deutschen Literaturarchiv (Marbach am Neckar, Germany)

See also Joseph Bornstein Collection (AR 4082)

Photographs removed to Photograph Collection


Language German
Call number 194425
Digitizing sponsor Leo Baeck Institute Archives
Book contributor Leo Baeck Institute Archives
Collection LeoBaeckInstitute; americana

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